political methodology

Michael Tomz

Michael Tomz
Professor of Political Science

Contact Info

E-mail: 
tomz [at] stanford [dot] edu
Telephone: 
(650) 725 4031
Office Location: 
310 Encina West
Office Hours: 
By Appointment
Biography: 

Michael Tomz is Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Center for International Development and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

Tomz has published in the fields of international relations, American politics, comparative politics, and statistical methods. He is the author of Reputation and International Cooperation: Sovereign Debt across Three Centuries and numerous articles in political science and economics journals.

Douglas Rivers

Douglas Rivers
Professor of Political Science

Contact Info

E-mail: 
rivers [at] stanford [dot] edu
Telephone: 
(650) 723 0769
Office Location: 
301 Encina West/Hoover 108
Biography: 

Douglas Rivers is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University. He is also a research fellow with the Stanford Institute for the Quantitative Study of Society and the president and CEO of YouGov/Polimetrix.

Jon Krosnick

Jon Krosnick
Professor of Political Science

Contact Info

E-mail: 
krosnick [at] stanford [dot] edu
Telephone: 
(650) 725 3031
Alternate Telephone: 
(650) 723 2614
Office Location: 
434 McClatchy /461 Encina Central
Office Hours: 
By Appointment
Biography: 

Jon A. Krosnick is Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences. An expert on questionnaire design and survey research methods, he has taught courses on survey methods around the world for 30 years and has served as a methodology consultant to government agencies, commercial firms, and academic scholars. His substantive work focuses on the psychology of political attitudes and behavior. He was co-principal investigator of the American National Election Study, the nation's preeminent academic research project exploring voter decision-making and political campaign effects. Dr. Krosnick studies how the American public's political attitudes are formed, change, and shape thinking and action.

Karen Jusko

Karen Jusko
Assistant Professor of Political Science

Contact Info

E-mail: 
kljusko [at] stanford [dot] edu
Telephone: 
(650) 724 9906
Office Location: 
441 Encina Central
Office Hours: 
On leave the 2014-2015 academic year.
Biography: 

Karen Jusko is an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University, and a faculty affiliate of Stanford's Europe Center and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality.

Simon Jackman

Simon Jackman
Professor of Political Science

Contact Info

E-mail: 
jackman [at] stanford [dot] edu
Telephone: 
(650) 723 4270
Office Location: 
315 Encina West
Office Hours: 
By Appointment
Biography: 

Simon Jackman’s research centers on American electoral politics, public opinion, democratic representation and the art and science of survey research.  In recent years his research has investigated the use of Internet as a platform for survey research, to better track the evolution of public opinion and produce more politically relevant assessments of American political attitudes.  In 2007-08 he was one of the principal investigators of the Cooperative Campaign Analysis Project, an Internet-based, six-wave, longitudinal study of the American electorate leading up to the 2008 Presidential election.  Jackman co-directs the Stanford Center for American Democracy and the is one of the principal investigators of the American National Election Studies, 2010-2013.

Justin Grimmer

Justin Grimmer
Associate Professor of Political Science

Contact Info

E-mail: 
jgrimmer [at] stanford [dot] edu
Telephone: 
(650) 723 3156
Office Location: 
414 Encina West
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Biography: 

Justin Grimmer is an associate professor of political science at Stanford University.  His research examines how representation occurs in American politics using new statistical methods.   His first book Representational Style in Congress: What Legislators Say and Why It Matters (Cambridge University Press, 2013) shows how senators define the type of representation they provide constituents and how this affects constituents' evaluations.  His second book The Impression of Influence: How Legislator Communication and Government Spending Cultivate a Personal Vote (Under Review, with Sean J.

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