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Past Workshops

Friday, January 25, 2019 -
1:15pm to 3:00pm
Encina Hall West, Room 400 (GSL)
Speaker: Sean Ingham, Assistant Professor of Political Science, UC San Diego
Field: Political Theory

Sean Ingham studies political theory with an emphasis on questions at the intersection of democratic theory and formal political theory. His​ work has been published in the Journal of Theoretical Politics, Political Studies, and Politics, Philosophy & Economics.

Friday, January 25, 2019 -
11:30am to 11:00pm
Encina Hall West, Room 400 (GSL)
Field: International Relations

Rob Blair is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs at Brown University. His research focuses on international intervention and the consolidation of state authority after civil war, with an emphasis on rule of law and security institutions. He has conducted fieldwork on these and related topics in Colombia, Liberia, Uganda, and Côte d'Ivoire.

Friday, January 18, 2019 -
1:15pm to 3:00pm
Encina Hall West, Room 400 (GSL)
Speaker: Adom Getachew, Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science and the College, University of Chicago
Field: Political Theory

Adom Getachew is the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science and the College. She holds a joint PhD in Political Science and African-American Studies from Yale University.

Friday, January 18, 2019 -
11:30am to 1:00pm
Encina Hall West, Room 400 (GSL)
Field: International Relations

Lindsay Hundley is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at Stanford University, specializing in international relations. Her research examines the sources of international conflict and why states intervene in the domestic politics of other countries.

Picture of Professor Christopher Warshaw
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 -
11:30am to 1:00pm
Encina Hall West, Room 400 (GSL)
Speaker: Christopher Warshaw, Assistant Professor of Political Science, George Washington University
Field: American Politics

One of the most profound questions in the study of democratic governance is whether the government is responsive to the preferences of its citizens and how the influence of the mass public varies across institutional contexts and over time.

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