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American Politics

Alejandra Aldridge is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Jacqueline Basu is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at Stanford University, specializing in political theory. She has additional training in computational social science methods and American politics. Her research centers on concepts of democratic stability and legitimacy, which she studies by synthesizing normative political philosophy with intellectual history and computational methods of text analysis. Jacqueline is currently a Geballe Dissertation Prize Fellow; prior to this, she was a Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow.

Jeanette Bustamante is a PhD candidate specializing in American Politics and Political Institutions. She is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

Katie Clayton is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Jennifer Cryer is a Ph.D. Candidate (ABD) at Stanford University, in the Department of Political Science. She is also a 2015 National Science Foundation, Graduate Research Fellow; a Stanford University E.D.G.E. Doctoral Fellow and D.A.R.E. Doctoral Fellow under the Vice Provost for Graduate Education. Her primary field of study is American politics, and she specializes, broadly, in political communication, political behavior, political geography, and computational social science.

Cameron is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Stanford University specializing in American and comparative politics. His research focuses on state and local politics, elections, and the evolution of institutions over time. Beginning in autumn 2019-2020, he will be the Thomas D. Dee II Graduate Fellow at the Bill Lane Center for the American West.  

Annie Franco is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Carl Gustafson a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Sandy Handan-Nader is a graduate student with an interest in political methodology and American politics.

David Hausman is a Ph.D. candidate in political science jointly pursuing a J.D. at Stanford Law School. He is currently conducting empirical research on arbitrariness in decisionmaking by administrative courts. Before beginning at Stanford, David worked at the International Center for Transitional Justice in Cape Town, South Africa and the Innovations for Successful Societies project at Princeton.

Jamal Johnson is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Shadie Khubba is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Mark Krass is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Masha Krupenkin is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Political Science. Her research focuses on the influence of partisan polarization on real-world behaviors. She examines the ways in which partisanship influences Americans’ political participation, as well as a variety of non-political actions. In terms of participation, she investigates whether partisan animosity encourages voter turnout, campaign donations, and seeking information about candidates.

Nathan Lee is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at Stanford University. His research examines the role of facts and expertise in American policymaking. His dissertation investigates the extent to which partisan bias undermines policymaker responsiveness to expert evidence. Leveraging both survey data of local and state officials and content-analysis of congressional committee hearings, Nathan demonstrates that policymakers exhibit an enduring commitment to facts and expertise, even while manifesting more subtle forms of partisan bias.

Rachel Lienesch is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Chloe Lim is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Stanford University. Her primary research interests include media, fact-checking, representation, political accountability in American Politics, quantitative methods, and text as data. Her research examines the media's ability to fact-check politicians and the consequences for campaigns when the media fact-checks a politician's statements. On the one hand, in published research, she shows that the media struggles to fact-check politicians’ statements accurately because it is an inherently subjective task.

Will Marble is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Leah Matchett is a graduate student with an interest in international relations and American politics.

Kevin Todd Mintz is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He holds an AB in government from Harvard College, an MSc in political theory from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Doctorate of Human Sexuality from the Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality. His PhD dissertation, Sex-Positive Political Theory: Pleasure, Power, Public Policy, and the Pursuit of Sexual Liberation, focuses on developing a justification for political institutions and civil society taking proactive roles in promoting sexual liberties.

Brett Parker is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Philip Petrov is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in political theory and American politics.

Artemis Seaford is a Ph.D. Candidate with an interest in political theory and comparative politics.

 

Neil Snyder is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in international relations and American politics.

Cole Tanigawa-Lau is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Dan Thompson is a PhD candidate in American politics and political methodology at Stanford University. His research studies electoral accountability in the US with a particular focus on the role of elections in local policymaking. He collects new data on local elections which he combines with large, untapped administrative datasets on government behavior. He then uses modern empirical techniques for causal inference to study how elections influence the policies local governments choose.

Matt Tyler is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Bradford Waldie is a graduate student with an interest in international relations and American politics.

Jesse Yoder is a Ph.D. candidate with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Chenoa Yorgason is a graduate student with an interest in American politics and political methodology.

Emily is a Ph.D candidate in political science and a Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow of the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education. She received her JD from Stanford Law School in 2016. From 2017-2019, she worked as an attorney sponsored by the Skadden Foundation Fellowship at the Voting Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union litigating voter suppression and redistricting cases in Kansas, Ohio, and New York. Her research focuses on the protection of minority voters in the redistricting process and the enfranchisement of new voters.

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