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American Politics

American Politics

The field of American Politics at Stanford includes the study of Congress, the bureaucracy, interest groups, the Presidency, voting, public opinion and participation, race and ethnicity; includes, among other perspectives, rational choice, historical, and behavioral perspectives; and encompasses, among other methods, quantitative analysis of aggregate data, qualitative fieldwork, survey research and randomized experiments. 

Adam Bonica is an Assistant Professor of Political Science. His research is at the intersection of big data and politics, with a focus on American Politics. Among his research contributions is the development of quantitative methods for measuring ideological preferences using campaign contributions. This provides a unified approach to measuring political preferences for a wide array of political actors, which are made available as part of the Database on Ideology, Money in Politics, and Elections (DIME).

David Brady holds the Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science in the Stanford Graduate School of Business and held the Morris M. Doyle Centennial Chair in Public Policy (emeritus). He is Deputy Director and Davies Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and has published seven books and over 100 papers in journals and books.

Bruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and The Spencer F. and Cleone P. Eccles Family Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012.
Gary W. Cox, William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science. In addition to numerous articles in the areas of legislative and electoral politics, Cox is author of The Efficient Secret (winner of the 1983 Samuel H Beer dissertation prize and the 2003 George H Hallett Award), co-author of Legislative Leviathan (winner of the 1993 Richard F Fenno Prize), author of Making Votes Count (winner of the 1998 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award, the 1998 Luebbert Prize and the 2007 George H Hallett Award); and co-author of Setting the Agenda (winner of the 2006 Leon D. Epstein Book Award).
I am an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. My research interests include American political behavior, public opinion, and race and ethnicity. In particular, my research explains how racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S. develop their identities and political attachments. While racial identity was traditionally seen as an ascribed trait in U.S. politics, the growth of minority populations, increases in intermarriage, and political recognition of multiracial labels signal a new racial moment and an acute change in how Americans view race and ethnicity.

John Ferejohn is the Samuel Tilden Professor of Law at New York University. His primary areas of scholarly interest are political theory and the study of political institutions and behavior. His current research focuses on Congress, law and legislation, constitutional adjudication in the United States and Europe, separation of powers, political campaigns and elections, and the philosophy of social science.

Morris P. Fiorina is the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution. He received an undergraduate degree from Allegheny College (1968) and a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester (1972), and taught at Caltech and Harvard before coming to Stanford in 1998.  Fiorina has written widely on American politics, with special emphasis on the study of representation and elections.

My research focuses on the nature of democratic government. How effective are elections in controlling the behavior of political representatives? What factors make elections more or less effective, and why? I combine modern statistical techniques with wide-ranging quantitative and text-based datasets on American political activity to attempt to answer these questions. I received my Ph.D. in Political Science and my A.M. in Statistics from Harvard University in 2015. I graduated from Stanford University in 2009 where I majored in Economics and Classics.

Shanto Iyengar holds the Chandler Chair in Communication at Stanford University where he is also Professor of Political Science and Director of the Political Communication Laboratory. Iyengar’s areas of expertise include the role of mass media in democratic societies, public opinion, and political psychology. Iyengar’s research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Ford Foundation, the Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Hewlett Foundation.
Karen Jusko is an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University, and a faculty affiliate of Stanford's Europe Center and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. Jusko's research is motivated by questions about the origins of contemporary democratic politics in the U.S., and in Europe. Drawing on survey research and historical census data, Jusko's current book project ties the different components of democratic representation -- participation, party politics, and the policy-making process -- to legislators' and political parties' electoral incentives.

Jon A. Krosnick is Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences. An expert on questionnaire design and survey research methods, he has taught courses on survey methods around the world for 30 years and has served as a methodology consultant to government agencies, commercial firms, and academic scholars. His substantive work focuses on the psychology of political attitudes and behavior. He was co-principal investigator of the American National Election Study, the nation's preeminent academic research project exploring voter decision-making and political campaign effects.

Terry M. Moe is the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. He has written extensively on public bureaucracy and the presidency, as well as the theory of political institutions more generally. His articles include "The New Economics of Organization," "The Politicized Presidency," "The Politics of Bureaucratic Structure," "Political Institutions: The Neglected Side of the Story," "Presidents, Institutions, and Theory," “The Presidential Power of Unilateral Action” (with William Howell), “Power and Political Institutions,” and “Political Control and the Power of the Agent.”

Clayton Nall is an Assistant Professor of Political Science.  His research focuses on American political geography, with an emphasis on the role of the state and public policy in the creation of place-based interests.  Clayton's book manuscript, The Road to Inequality, examines how the largest public works project in US history created Republican suburbs, increased the urban-suburban political divide, and led to reduced investment in urban infrastructure.

Jack Rakove is the William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies and professor of political science and (by courtesy) law at Stanford, where he has taught since 1980. His principal areas of research include the origins of the American Revolution and Constitution, the political practice and theory of James Madison, and the role of historical knowledge in constitutional litigation.

Condoleezza Rice is currently the Denning Professor in Global Business and the Economy at the Stanford Graduate School of Business; the Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution; and a professor of Political Science at Stanford University. She is also a founding partner of RiceHadleyGates, LLC.

Douglas Rivers is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University. He is the president and CEO of YouGov/Polimetrix.

Paul M. Sniderman is the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. Sniderman’s current research focuses on the institutional organization of political choice; multiculturalism and inclusion of Muslims in Western Europe; and the politics of race in the United States. Most recently, he co-authored Paradoxes of Liberal Democracy: Islam, Western Europe and the Danish Cartoon Crisis (with Michael Bang Petersen, Rune Slothuus, and Rune Stubager) and The Reputational Premium: A Theory of Party Identification and Policy Reasoning (with Edward H. Stiglitz).
Michael Tomz is Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Center for International Development and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Tomz has published in the fields of international relations, American politics, comparative politics, and statistical methods. He is the author of Reputation and International Cooperation: Sovereign Debt Across Three Centuries and numerous articles in political science and economics journals. Tomz received the International Studies Association’s Karl Deutsch Award, given to a scholar who, within 10 years of earning a Ph.D., has made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations.

Barry R. Weingast is the Ward C. Krebs Family Professor, Department of Political Science, and a Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution. He served as Chair, Department of Political Science, from 1996 through 2001. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

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