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Political Methodology

Political Methodology

The field of Political Methodology includes training in statistics, econometrics and formal theory; reviewing and developing new methods for the scientific study of politics; has particular emphases in Bayesian statistical inference, causal inference, computationally-intensive approaches to statistical inference, the design and analysis of experiments, game theory, the graphical display of quantitative information, sampling for survey-based research, the analysis of spatial data, the statistical analysis of text. Faculty: Avidit Acharya, Adam Bonica, Gary W. Cox, Justin Grimmer, Jens Hainmueller, Shanto Iyengar, Simon D. Jackman, Karen L. Jusko, Douglas Rivers, Paul M. Sniderman, Michael Tomz.

Avi Acharya is an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University. His research is mainly in the fields of political economy, positive political theory, and game theory. Before coming to Stanford, Avi taught for two years at the University of Rochester.

Adam Bonica is an Assistant Professor of Political Science. His research is at the intersection of big data and politics, with a focus on American Politics. Among his research contributions is the development of quantitative methods for measuring ideological preferences using campaign contributions. This provides a unified approach to measuring political preferences for a wide array of political actors, which are made available as part of the Database on Ideology, Money in Politics, and Elections (DIME).

Gary W. Cox, William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science. In addition to numerous articles in the areas of legislative and electoral politics, Cox is author of The Efficient Secret (winner of the 1983 Samuel H Beer dissertation prize and the 2003 George H Hallett Award), co-author of Legislative Leviathan (winner of the 1993 Richard F Fenno Prize), author of Making Votes Count (winner of the 1998 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award, the 1998 Luebbert Prize and the 2007 George H Hallett Award); and co-author of Setting the Agenda (winner of the 2006 Leon D. Epstein Book Award).
James D. Fearon is Theodore and Frances Geballe Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. His research focuses on political violence – interstate, civil, and ethnic conflict in particular – although he has also worked on aspects of democratic theory and the impact of democracy on foreign policy.

Vicky Fouka is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. Her research examines how identity and attitudes are shaped by state policies and history and how they themselves affect economic and political outcomes. She is particularly interested in the dynamics of assimilation, with a focus on immigrant groups’ responses to assimilationist policies and to patterns of native discrimination. She examines these issues using economic theory and statistical techniques applied on both modern and historical data.

Justin Grimmer is an associate professor of political science at Stanford University. His research examines how representation occurs in American politics using new statistical methods. His first book Representational Style in Congress: What Legislators Say and Why It Matters (Cambridge University Press, 2013) shows how senators define the type of representation they provide constituents and how this affects constituents' evaluations. His second book The Impression of Influence: How Legislator Communication and Government Spending Cultivate a Personal Vote (Under Review, with Sean J. Westwood and Solomon Messing) demonstrates how legislators ensure they receive credit for government actions.
Jens Hainmueller is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Stanford Graduate School of Business. His research interests include statistical methods, political economy, and political behavior. His research has appeared in journals such as the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Review of Economics and Statistics, Political Analysis, International Organization, and the Journal of Statistical Software, and has received awards from the American Political Science Association, the Society of Political Methodology, the Midwest Political Science Association.

My research focuses on the nature of democratic government. How effective are elections in controlling the behavior of political representatives? What factors make elections more or less effective, and why? I combine modern statistical techniques with wide-ranging quantitative and text-based datasets on American political activity to attempt to answer these questions. I received my Ph.D. in Political Science and my A.M. in Statistics from Harvard University in 2015. I graduated from Stanford University in 2009 where I majored in Economics and Classics.

Shanto Iyengar holds the Chandler Chair in Communication at Stanford University where he is also Professor of Political Science and Director of the Political Communication Laboratory. Iyengar’s areas of expertise include the role of mass media in democratic societies, public opinion, and political psychology. Iyengar’s research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Ford Foundation, the Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Hewlett Foundation.
Karen Jusko is an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University, and a faculty affiliate of Stanford's Europe Center and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. Jusko's research is motivated by questions about the origins of contemporary democratic politics in the U.S., and in Europe. Drawing on survey research and historical census data, Jusko's current book project ties the different components of democratic representation -- participation, party politics, and the policy-making process -- to legislators' and political parties' electoral incentives.

Douglas Rivers is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University. He is the president and CEO of YouGov/Polimetrix.

Michael Tomz is Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Center for International Development and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Tomz has published in the fields of international relations, American politics, comparative politics, and statistical methods. He is the author of Reputation and International Cooperation: Sovereign Debt Across Three Centuries and numerous articles in political science and economics journals. Tomz received the International Studies Association’s Karl Deutsch Award, given to a scholar who, within 10 years of earning a Ph.D., has made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations.
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